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NYC school gives kids woke BLM coloring book with ‘queer, trans-affirming’ lessons

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A New York City elementary school is facing criticism for doling out a woke Black Lives Matter coloring book to kids as young as 5 that features “queer and transgender affirming” lessons and teachings on revolutionary politics, according to a report.

Students at PS 321 in Brooklyn’s Park Slope — which teaches children from kindergarten through fifth grade — were handed the “What We Believe: A Black Lives Matter Principles Activity Book” coloring book last week as part of a Black History Month lesson, the Free Press reported.

The book, which prominently features the 13 “guiding principles” of the BLM movement, uses various drawings and worksheets to get its message across.

“What We Believe: A Black Lives Matter Principles Activity Book” features the 13 “guiding principles” of the BLM movement. Black Lives Matter at School

Under the title trans affirming principle, the book spells out that “we know that cisgender (not trans) people in our society have privilege, and we want to uplift trans people, especially black trans women who often experience violence.”

Meanwhile, the book also lists off a slew of the BLM movement’s national demands — including a push to “fund counselors not cops” and “mandate black history & ethnic studies.”

Some parents, however, insisted the coloring book didn’t actually teach their kids about black history — and instead presented controversial ideas “as fact.”

“It’s not necessarily true. It’s not like every black person believes in these principles,” the mom of a fourth-grade student told the Free Press.


PS 321 in Brooklyn's Park Slope
Students at PS 321 — which teaches kids from kindergarten through fifth grade — in Brooklyn’s Park Slope were handed the woke coloring book last week as part of a Black History Month lesson. Paul Martinka

She added the book doesn’t go “into enough detail and there is no mention of specific people. It just feels very vague.”  

PS 321 and the city’s Department of Education didn’t immediately respond to The Post’s request for comment Thursday.

In a statement, a DOE spokesperson told the Free Press: “Anytime parents have a concern about resources used in school, we encourage them to share their concerns to the school principal or district superintendent.”

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